09.06.2016 – High-profile Spin+X publication: Room-temperature spin-orbit torque in NiMnSb

Making magnets flip like cats at room temperature

In today’s world of ever-increasing digital information storage anpost picd computation, the next information storage revolution seeks to exploit a novel effect arising from the relativistic physics of Einstein, which allows to effectively convert a new type of magnet into cats. Through this effect, these magnets can flip themselves through the internal motion of their own electrons. One can almost describe these new types of magnets as relativistic magnetic cats.

In these new magnetic materials, a current running through the magnet can flip the direction of the magnetization depending on the direction of the current. This novel phenomenon in physics, dubbed spin-orbit torques, links the spin-degree of freedom of magnets that gives rise to the magnetization, to the charge degree of freedom that allows for current-charge motion inside the material. Continue reading

28.08.2014 Tunable spin-charge converter made of gallium-arsenide realized

International group of scientists led by Prof. Dr. Jairo Sinova from Mainz University open up new approach in searching and engineering spintronic materials

Publication in Nature Materials

spin-charge-converter

Tunable spin Hall angle device based on GaAs through field induced intervalley repopulation. Ill./©: Jairo Sinova 

Spin-charge converters are important devices in spintronics, an electronic which is not only based on the charge of electrons but also on their spin and the spin-related magnetism. Spin-charge converters enable the transformation of electric into magnetic signals and vice versa. Recently, the research group of Professor Jairo Sinova from the Institute of Physics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in collaboration with researchers from the UK, the Czech Republic, and Japan has for the first time realized a new efficient spin-charge converter based on the common semiconductor material gallium-arsenide (GaAs).

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03.03.2014 Relativity shakes a magnet

Our research group from Mainz University has predicted and discovered a new principle for magnetic recording / Publication in Nature Nanotechnology

 

GaMnAs_magnet

Electrically shaken GaMnAs magnet. Ill./©: Jairo Sinova

Our research group of at the Institute of Physics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), in collaboration with researchers from Prague, Cambridge, and Nottingham, have predicted and discovered a new physical phenomenon that allows to manipulate the state of a magnet by electric signals. Continue reading